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Tuesday, April 16, 2024

Linear Graph – Definition & Properties

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Have you ever heard of a linear graph? Let’s discuss what types of graphs these are. Starting with a linear graph, a linear graph is a type of graph that uses points and lines to represent change over time. It is also known as a line chart or line plot. It is a graph that depicts a line connecting several points or a line that depicts the relationship between the points. The graph depicts quantitative data between two changing variables by connecting a series of successive data points with a line or curve. Linear graphs compare these two variables on two axes: vertical and horizontal.

Definition of Linear Graph

Linear means straight and a graph is a diagram that shows a connection or relation between two or more quantities. So, a linear graph is simply a straight line or straight graph drawn on a plane connecting points with x and y coordinates.

Types of Linear Graph

There are 3 types of linear graphs in statistics –

  1. Simple linear graphs
  2. Multiple linear graphs
  3. Compound linear graphs.

Depending on the type of data being evaluated, each of these graph types has a different application.

What Are Scatter Plots?

A scatter plot (also known as a scatter chart or scatter graph) uses dots to represent the values of two numerical variables. Each dot on the horizontal and vertical axes represents a value for a single data point. Scatter plots are generally used to investigate the relationships between variables.

When Should You Use Scatter Plots?

Scatter plots are primarily used to observe and demonstrate relationships between two numerical variables. A scatter plot’s dots not only report the values of individual data points but a scatter plot also patterns when the data is viewed as a whole.

Scatter plots are commonly used to identify correlational relationships. In these cases, we want to know what a good prediction for the vertical value would be if we were given a specific horizontal value. The variable on the horizontal axis is frequently referred to as an independent variable, while the variable on the vertical axis is referred to as the dependent variable. Variable relationships can be described in a variety of ways: positive or negative, strong or weak, linear or nonlinear.

If you want to learn more about scatter plots and linear graphs, you can visit the Cuemath website to understand the topic in a fun manner.

Is it possible for a line graph to be linear?

The graph depicts quantitative data between two changing variables by connecting a series of successive data points with a line or curve. Linear graphs compare these two variables on two axes: vertical and horizontal.

Applications of Linear Graphs

In our daily lives, we notice variations in the values of various quantities as a result of variations in the values of other quantities. For example, if the number of people visiting a restaurant increases, the restaurant’s earnings increase, and vice versa, if a number of people are employed, the time required to complete a job decreases. Thus, in some cases, the value of one quantity increases as the value of another quantity increases, whereas in other cases, the value of one quantity decreases as the value of another quantity increases.

As a result, two quantities can exist in either direct or indirect proportion. The relationship between these two quantities can be represented arithmetically or graphically (using graphs).

Real-Life Applications

Linear equations are those that, when graphed, produce straight lines.

Examples from real life include:

  • Wage calculation based on an hourly pay rate
  • Calculating medicine doses based on the weights of patients
  • Determining the perimeters of squares

Hiring a car if a deposit is paid and an hourly fee is charged

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